Types of Error Coins

  1. Clipped Planchet—An incomplete coin, missing 10 to 25% of the metal. Incomplete planchets result from accidents when the steel rods used to punch out blanks from the metal strip overlap a portion of the strip already punched. There are curved, straight, ragged, incomplete, and elliptical clips. Values may be greater or less depending on the nature and size of the clip. Coins with more than one clip usually command higher values.

  2. Multiple Strike—A coin with at least one additional image from being struck again off center. Value increases with the number of strikes. These minting errors occur when a finished coin goes back into the press and is struck again with the same dies. The presence or absence of a date will also affect values.
  3. Blank or Planchet—A blank disc of metal intended for coinage but not struck with dies. In the process of preparation for coinage, the blanks are first punched from a strip of metal and then milled to upset the rim. In most instances, first-process pieces (blanks without upset rim) are slightly more valuable than the finished planchets. Values shown are for the most common pieces.
  4. Defective Die—A coin showing raised metal from a large die crack, or small rim break. Coins that show evidence of light die cracks, polishing, or very minor die damage are generally of little or no value. Prices shown here are for coins with very noticeable, raised die-crack lines, or those for which the die broke away, producing an unstruck area known as a cud.
  5. Off Center—A coin that has been struck out of collar and incorrectly centered with part of the design missing. Values are for coins with approximately 10 to 20% of design missing from obsolete coins, or 20 to 60% missing from modern coins. These are misstruck coins that were made when the planchet did not enter the coinage press properly. Coins that are struck only slightly off center, with none of the design missing, are called broadstrikes (see the next category). Those with nearly all of the impression missing are generally worth more. but those with a read-able date and mint are the most valuable.
  6. Broadstrike—A coin that was struck outside the retaining collar. When coins are struck without being contained in the collar die, they spread out larger than normal pieces. All denominations have a plain edge.
  7. Lamination—A flaw whereby a fragment of metal has peeled off the coin's surface. This defect occurs when a foreign substance, such as gas oxides or dirt, becomes trapped in the strip as it is rolled out to the proper thickness. Lamination flaws may be missing or still attached to the coin's surface. Minor flaws may only decrease a coin's value, while a clad coin that is missing the full surface of one or both sides is worth more than the values listed here.
  8. Brockage—A mirror image of the design impressed on the opposite side of the same coin. These errors are caused when a struck coin remains on either die after striking, and impresses its image into the next blank planchet as it is struck, leaving a negative or mirror image. Off-center and partial Brockage coins are worth less than those with full impression. Coins with negative impressions on both sides are usually mutilated pieces made outside the mint by the pressing together of coins.
  9. Wrong Planchet—A coin struck on a planchet intended for another denomination or of the wrong metal. Examples of these are cents struck on dime planchets, nickels on cent planchets, or quarters on dime planchets. Values vary depending on the type. of error involved. Those struck on coins of a different denomination that were previously struck normally are of much greater value.


Waffled Coins

In mid-2003. the U.S. Mint acquired machines to eliminate security concerns and the cost associated with providing Mint police escorts to private vendors for the melting of scrap. sub-standard struck coins, planchets, and blanks. Under high pressure, the rollers and blades of these machines cancel the coins and blanks in a manner similar in appearance to the surface of a waffle, and they are popularly known by that term. This process has effectively kept most misstruck coins produced after 2003 from becoming available to collectors. Waffled examples are known for all six 2003-dated coin denominations, from the Lincoln cent through the Sacagawea dollar. The Mint has not objected to these pieces' trading in the open market because they are not considered coins with legal tender status.


Misstruck Coins and Error Pieces

Misstruck and Error Pieces

1

2

3 4 5 6 7 8
Large Cent $55.00

$500

$125

$20

$300

$60

$20

$500

Indian 1¢ 25.00

350

15

120

60

10

300

Lincoln 1¢ (95% Copper) 5.00

40

3

12

5

6

2

35

Steel 1¢ 20.00

225

20

15

75

40

15

150

Lincoln 1¢ zinc 2.50

30

2

15

5

4

15

40

Liberty 5¢ 30.00

650

50

35

150

125

25

400

Buffalo 5¢ 35.00

1,200

40

400

200

25

900

Jefferson 5¢ 6.50

40

15

15

10

10

20

70

Wartime 5¢ 15.00

350

350

25

160

70

15

400

Barber 10¢ 65.00

500

10

75

210

100

15

200

Mercury 10¢ 40.00

500

10

35

175

75

15

225

Roosevelt 10¢ (S) 12.00

200

10

35

100

65

15

120

Roosevelt 10¢ (C) 4.00

40

3

15

8

10

16

50

Washington 25¢ (S) 15.00

250

85

20

150

100

10

285

Washington 25¢ (C) 5.00

100

6

10

35

15

25

60

Bicentennial 25¢ 30.00

350

50

160

65

50

250

Statehood 25¢ 60.00

500

25

165

125

30

400

Franklin 50¢ 60.00

800

60

100

700

450

30

650

Kennedy 50¢ (S) 30.00

900

60

70

375

250

40

400

Kennedy 50¢ (C) 25.00

400

45

50

125

75

25

300

Bicentennial 50¢ 45.00

475

-

80

300

75

25

750

Silver $1 50.00

4,000

1,250

950

2,000

1,200

50

Eisenhower $1 40.00

1,200

60

500

800

200

50

1,200

Bicentennial $1 50.00

2.000

750

900

200

50

1,500

Anthony $1 40.00

800

85

100

325

75

30

375

Sacagawea $1 100.00

1,000

125

50

700

300

50

650

Note:   1 = Clipped Planchet; 2 = Multiple Strike; 3 = Blank Planchet; 4 = Defective Die; 5 = Off Center; 6 = Broadstrike; 7 = Lamination; 8 = Brockage


Wrong Metals

1¢ ZN

1¢ CU

1¢ Steel

(S) 10¢

(C) 10¢

(S) 25¢

(C) 25¢ (C) 50¢

Indian 1¢

np

np

np

$4,500

np

np

np

np

Lincoln 1¢

np

1,200

$300

np

np

np

Buffalo 5¢

np

$3,500

np

1,200

np

np

np

np

Jefferson 5¢

$200

225

$900

250

200

np

np

np

Wartime 5¢

np

2,000

3,000

2,000

np

np

np

np

Wash 25¢ (S)

np

900

5,000

$500

400

np

Wash 25¢ (C)

800

np

200

350

np

1976 25¢

np

1,000

np

1,000

600

np

Statehood 25¢

2,200

np

825

np

1,500

np

np

Walking 50¢

np

np

np

np

Franklin 50¢

np

5,000

np

5,000

7,000

np

$1,500

np

np

Kennedy 50¢

np

3,500

np

1,000

2,000

2,500

350

$650

1976 50¢

np

np

1,250

800

Eisenhower $1

np

10,000

np

8,000

9,000

6,000

$5,000

Anthony $1

np

3,500

np

5,000

np

1,500

np

Sacagawea $1

3,000

np

np

5,000

np

4,000

np

1,500

np

Note: ZN = Zinc; CU = Copper; S = Silver; C = Copper-Nickel Clad; np = not possible
The Kennedy fifty-cent piece struck on an Anthony one-dollar planchet is very rare. Coins struck over other coins of different denominations are usually valued three to five times higher than these prices. Values for statehood quarter errors vary with each type and state, and are generally much higher than for other quarters. Coins made from mismatched dies (statehood quarter obverse combined with Sacagawea dollar reverse) are extremely rare.